Diferenças entre edições de "Alice Através do Espelho e O Que Ela Encontrou Por Lá"

 
== Cap. 4 - Tweedledum e Tweedledee ==
[[Image:Tennieldumdee.jpg|144px|thumb|right|If[...] itse wasera soassim, itpodia might beser; ande ifse itfosse were soassim, it would beseria; butmas ascomo itnão isn'té, itnão ain'té. That'sIsto é logiclógico.]]
[[File:Briny Beach.jpg|144px|thumb|right|"The time has come", the Walrus said, <br> "To talk of many things: <br> Of shoes — and ships — and sealing wax — <br> Of cabbages —and Kings —]]
 
* "Contrariwise,Ao contrário", continuedcontinuou [[w:Tweedledum and Tweedledee|Tweedledee]], "ifse itera was soassim, it mightpodia beser; and ife itse werefosse soassim, it would beseria; butmas ascomo itnão isn'té, itnão ain'té. That'sIsto é logiclógico."
 
[[File:Red King sleeping.jpg|144px|thumb|right| He's"Agora dreamingestá now...sonhando", andobservou whatTweedledee. do"Com youque thinkacha he'sque dreamingele aboutsonha?"]]
* ''"The time has come", the Walrus said, <br> "To talk of many things: <br> Of shoes — and ships — and sealing wax — <br> Of cabbages — and Kings — <br> And why the Sea is boiling hot — <br> And whether pigs have wings." ''
** Tweedledee, reciting ''[[w:The Walrus and the Carpenter|The Walrus and the Carpenter]]'', st. 11
 
* ''"É chegada a hora", disse a Morsa, <br> "De falar de muitas coisas: <br> De sapatos... e barcos... e vazas...<br> De repolhos... e reis... e lousas... <br> E por que o mar tanto ferve <br> E se os porcos têm asas."''
* 'I weep for you', the Walrus said,<br>'I deeply sympathise.'
** Tweedledee, recitando ''[[w:The Walrus and the Carpenter|A Morsa e o Carpinteiro (The Walrus and the Carpenter)]]'', st. 1711
 
* "Choro por vocês", disse a Morsa,<br> "Tenho o coração contristado."
* 'He's dreaming now,' said Tweedledee: 'and what do you think he's dreaming about?' <br> Alice said 'Nobody can guess that.' <br> 'Why, about ''you!''' Tweedledee exclaimed, clapping his hands triumphantly. 'And if he left off dreaming about you, where do you suppose you'd be?' <br> 'Where I am now, of course,' said Alice. <br> 'Not you!' Tweedledee retorted contemptuously. 'You'd be nowhere. Why, you're only a sort of thing in his dream!' <br> 'If that there King was to wake,' added Tweedledum, 'you'd go out — bang! — just like a candle!' <br> 'I shouldn't!' Alice exclaimed indignantly. 'Besides, if ''I'm'' only a sort of thing in his dream, what are ''you'', I should like to know?' <br> 'Ditto' said Tweedledum. <br> 'Ditto, ditto!' cried Tweedledee. <br> He shouted this so loud that Alice couldn't help saying, 'Hush! You'll be waking him, I'm afraid, if you make so much noise.' <br> 'Well, it no use ''your'' talking about waking him,' said Tweedledum, 'when you're only one of the things in his dream. You know very well you're not real.' <br> 'I ''am'' real!' said Alice and began to cry. <br> 'You won't make yourself a bit realler by crying,' Tweedledee remarked: 'there's nothing to cry about.' <br> 'If I wasn't real,' Alice said — half-laughing through her tears, it all seemed so ridiculous — 'I shouldn't be able to cry.' <br> 'I hope you don't suppose those are ''real'' tears?' Tweedledum interrupted in a tone of great contempt. <br> 'I know they're talking nonsense,' Alice thought to herself: 'and it's foolish to cry about it.' So she brushed away her tears, and went on as cheerfully as she could.
** ''A Morsa e o Carpinteiro (Walrus and Carpenter)'', st. 17
 
* 'He's'"Agora dreamingestá nowsonhando",' saidobservou Tweedledee:. 'and"Com whatque doacha youque thinkele he's dreaming aboutsonha?"''' <br> Alice saiddisse: 'Nobody"Isso canninguém guesspode thatsaber.' "<br> 'Why"Ora, aboutcom ''you!'você''! Tweedledee exclaimedexclamou, clappingbatendo his hands triumphantlypalmas. 'And"E ifse heparasse leftde offsonhar dreamingcom about youvocê, whereonde doacha youque supposevocê you'd beestaria?'" <br> 'Where"Onde Iestou am nowagora, ofé courseclaro",' saidrespondeu Alice. <br> 'Not"Não, younão!'" Tweedledee retortedretrucou contemptuouslydesdenhoso. 'You'd be nowhere. Why, you're only a sort of thing in his dream!' <br> 'If that there King was to wake,' added Tweedledum, 'you'd go out — bang! — just like a candle!' <br> 'I shouldn't!' Alice exclaimed indignantly. 'Besides, if ''I'm'' only a sort of thing in his dream, what are ''you'', I should like to know?' <br> 'Ditto' said Tweedledum. <br> 'Ditto, ditto!' cried Tweedledee. <br> He shouted this so loud that Alice couldn't help saying, 'Hush! You'll be waking him, I'm afraid, if you make so much noise.' <br> 'Well, it no use ''your'' talking about waking him,' said Tweedledum, 'when you're only one of the things in his dream. You know very well you're not real.' <br> 'I ''am'' real!' said Alice and began to cry. <br> 'You won't make yourself a bit realler by crying,' Tweedledee remarked: 'there's nothing to cry about.' <br> 'If I wasn't real,' Alice said — half-laughing through her tears, it all seemed so ridiculous — 'I shouldn't be able to cry.' <br> 'I hope you don't suppose those are ''real'' tears?' Tweedledum interrupted in a tone of great contempt. <br> 'I know they're talking nonsense,' Alice thought to herself: 'and it's foolish to cry about it.' So she brushed away her tears, and went on as cheerfully as she could.
 
* "You know," he added very gravely, "it's one of the most serious things that can possibly happen to one in a battle — to get one's head cut off."
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